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DNA STUDY

Hawgood Family

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Below is an overview of Hawgood results. There are some matches to other surnnames, and these are shown ias marker values in the detailed results as well as a breakdown on the ‘matches to other surnames’.

We have tested 67 locations on the DNA of eight Hawgoods, some of which have known ancestors through a paper trail, and some do not. The results have enabled us to determine where the branches each of those tested fit into the family tree.

Related Hawgoods will have marker values match. Where there is a mismatch but where that some mismatch occurs in more than one person, this usually represents a new branch of the family tree. It is possibly but very unlikely that the same mutation will occur by chance in unrelated branches, except with the very fast mutating markers such as DYS724a and DYS724b whose mutation rates are up to 10 times faster than the normal mutation speed of most other markers.

The diagram below shows where and which mutations occurred (purple ovals). The pink boxes show the number of generations between various ancestors. The dotted lines show links derived from the DNA results, with the unbroken lines showing known links. The test results have enabled us to connect three broken branches into the main family tree.


Most markers (or locations) of those tested are exactly the same - for example looking at the detailed results, the first marker is DYS19, and all those tested have a result of 15 repeats. The same applies to the next 18 markers. DYS449 is the first variation and this is seen in Ma and Mi who are known third cousins, and who had not been previously linked into the main tree due to a lack of paper trail prior to 1800. Because of the common ancestry of Ma and Mi, we know that this mutation occurred in 1842 or earlier.

The most significant variation is on DYS464 which is a polymorphic marker with at least four  different values. The normal values for Hawgood DNA and indeed many of the same Haplotype (I1) are 12,14,15 and 16. However a mutation has occurred which is seen in four individuals which have different values. Of the first four, C and G are known to be both descended from William born 1704, and they both have values of 12-14-15-16. T and Ar also have values of 12-14-15-16, as well as very closely matching markers. Based on the limited number of variances, they would most likely also descended from William of 1704 but it is also possible that Ar infact descended from an earlier Hawgood line - see ‘matches with other surnames’.

Of the second four, D and An are both known to be descended from Thomas born 1706. They have values at DYS 464 of 14-15-16-16 and 14-15-15-16. These values are quite unusual, and these results show that there is a distinction between the lines of William Hawgood of 1704 and Thomas Hawgood of 17016 - ie two distinct branches of the family tree.

Ma and Mi are second cousins and also share the same unusual DYS 464 as D and An; with 14-15-15-16 and 14-15-16-16. It can be concluded that they are both from the Thomas side of the tree.  We cannot identify the exact date when DYS 464 mutated but it must have been after John Hawgood born in 1663 in Church Brampton, and before John born 1769, as the latter must have held the mutation given that it was then passed down to his descendents.




Summary results - Hawgoods

DNA study paper